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  • Tags: Mill

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/AGW00114.jpg
Crossley Mill is on the left and to the right of it are the houses of Machpelah.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ANP00101.jpg
Oats Royd Mill is in the background and below it to the left is Church Hill.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ANP00102.jpg
The Murgatroyd’s Oats Royd Mill before the fire in February 1989 which totally gutted the centre six storey building. This has been sympathetically replaced by an apartment block and the whole mill complex is now residential. At its peak the mill…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ANP00105.jpg
Oats Royd Mill is in the background and below it to the let is Church Hill.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ANP00106.jpg
The former mill on Burnley Road, opposite Station Road, has now been demolished and replaced with a private housing estate.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ANP00107.jpg
The former worsted mill was severely damaged by fire in February 1989 with the six storey mill on the right beyond the first bridge totally gutted. This has been sympathetically replaced by an apartment block and the whole mill complex is now…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00107.jpg
There are various names on the back of this picture, but it is not clear to whom they refer: Lloyd G.M. Hampton, Sam Green, Miss Kitchen, James Cockcroft, Fleta Barnes, Craven, mary Greenwood. At the front: William Hartley, John Greenwood.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00109.jpg
This view over the Nutclough, Birchcliffe and Foster Lane areas of Hebden Bridge is part of a photograph held by Allan Moss. Stubbing School was built in 1878, hence the date is given as prior to that.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00110.jpg
The picture shows the Warping or Beaming department, technically this is back beam warping, the usual practice in the cotton industry, as opposed to section warping in the woollen and worsted trades. A very large unit!

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00111.jpg
Ethel Crabtree at Work. On her right is a dobby, a mechanism for pattern weaving.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00112.jpg
Winding the warp yarns, in one winding operation, onto the weaving beam.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00113.jpg
These machines are bobbin winding frames. The front one is probably made by Joseph Stubbs Ltd, Manchester, who specialised in winding machinery and had works at Ancoats and Openshaw. The nearest machine is 'assembly winding' ie winding two ends from…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00115.jpg
The machine was manufactured by Howard & Bullough in Accrington, Lancashire. Founded in 1851, the company was a major manufacturer of power looms in the 1860s.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00116.jpg
This is carding, the first process in the Cardroom, where the raw wool or cotton is prepared for subsequent spinning by separating the fibres to form a sliver, this is performed on a revolving flat card made by Platt Bros & Co Ltd of Oldham, the…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/CWS00117.jpg
This look like a woollen card hopper, but actually the photo was taken in the Blowing Room and shows a hopper opener, feeding a line of machines leading to the scutcher. Cotton comes in press-packed bales, and it must be loosened up or 'opened' and…
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