Browse Items (54 total)

  • Tags: Passenger Train

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/DNT00268.jpg
On the L&YR’s ‘Pickle Bridge’ line which opened in 1881 running from near Wyke on the Halifax-Bradford line to join the Calder Valley main line east of Brighouse. The station opened in 1881 at the same time as the line but ‘temporarily’ closed in…

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The station on the Halifax –Bradford line opened at the same time as the line in August 1850. The station was closed in 1965.

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On the ‘short line’ between Bradford & Leeds, built by the Leeds Bradford & Halifax Junction Railway, which opened in 1854 and was operated from the start by the Great Northern Railway who subsequently acquired it. The station opened with the line…

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A passenger service approaching Bradford on the GNR’s Queensbury line with the branch to City Roads Goods which had opened in 1876 joining on the right. Horton Park Station is just visible beyond the last carriage, this had opened in 1880 and was…

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The station, which had been known as Shipley Bridge Street, was the terminus of a loop line built by the GNR from Laisterdyke opening in 1875 with intermediate stations at Eccleshill, Idle and Thackley The station closed to passengers in 1931 and to…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/DNT00221.jpg
The first station out of Bradford on the Midland’s line towards Shipley it was opened in 1868 and closed nearly a hundred years later in 1965.

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A terminus station seen here after the introduction of DMUs so probably about 1960. The first station on the site was built in 1850 and operated by the L&YR but the impressive double vaulted train shed seen here dates from 1888 when the station was…

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The station here was originally built in 1846 by the Leeds & Bradford Railway which had been formed to connect the two towns with a railway along the Aire Valley; it was acquired by the MR in 1853 who rebuilt the station. It was intended that when…

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The station here was originally built in 1846 by the Leeds & Bradford Railway which had been formed to connect the two towns with a railway along the Aire Valley; it was acquired by the MR in 1853 who rebuilt the station. It was intended that when…

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The MR’s branch from the Otley & Ilkley Joint Railway to their Aire Valley line at Apperley Junction had opened in 1865 and the station at Guiseley was opened at the same time. The connection to the Aire Valley line was Leeds facing which meant that…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/DNT00167.jpg
Morly Low Station with excurtionists rushing to get on a LNWR Blackpool Special at Morley Feast. Towards the end of the 19th century it was common practice for railway companies to put on special trains for a town’s local holiday.

The word ‘Feast'…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/DNT00159.jpg
On the GNR ‘short line’ from Leeds Central to Bradford the station opened with the line in 1854. To the west of the station there was the junction with the Pudsey loop line which had opened in 1893 and closed in 1965. Bramley station closed in 1966…

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/DNT00145.jpg
Originally on the Leeds & Selby Railway which opened in 1834 from Marsh Lane which was the first station in Leeds. However due to the machinations of George Hudson, the ‘Railway King’, it fell into disuse between 1840 and 1850 and the line was not…

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The station, or probably a halt, on the Leeds Selby and York line was opened in 1930 by the LNER between Marsh Lane and Cross Gates stations following construction of a large housing estate. It was closed in 1960. The station is seen here possibly…

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A North Eastern Railway Leeds to Edinburgh service about to depart for York from New Station. The roof sign with its back to the station advertising Waddington Pianos was on New Station Street, off Boar Lane, which was the access to the station from…

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Seen here late 19th or early 20th century looking westwards with an NER train on the right. This view and the bridge across the lines remained little changed until into the second half of the 20th century. The platform numbering is not sequential.…

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Built by the Midland Railway in 1846, with subsequent re-builds, it was the first station in Leeds centre. Up until the building of New Station in 1869 it was shared by the London & North Western Railway but thereafter it was used exclusively by the…

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The rather forlorn looking station in BR days. It is the site of the first railway station in Leeds opened by the Leeds & Selby Railway in 1834 although about a mile east of the city centre in an area described at the time as ‘one of the most…

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21 June 1912. 'The Manchester to Leeds express literally burst the rails asunder' on the already notorious Charlestown Curve between Hebden Bridge and Todmorden killing four people. Picture donated by Charlie Greenwood.

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21 June 1912. 'The Manchester to Leeds express literally burst the rails asunder' on the already notorious Charlestown Curve between Todmorden and Hebden Bridge killing four passengers and injuring many more. Seen here the derailed Aspinall 2-4-2T…

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Loco number 11279 taking up water on the troughs between Sowerby Tunnel and Luddendenfoot as it heads a Manchester bound train. Water troughs such as these enabled steam engines to take on water without stopping.

http://www.penninehorizons.org/Omeka_photos/ALC00457.jpg
A westbound train, headed by an Aspinall 4-4-2, departing from Mytholmroyd Station pre-First World War. It is running on the 'slow' lines which would have been unusual for an express train, possibly due to the 'fast' line being recently…
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